Tagged: North Korea

North Korea Published a Letter From “Abraham Lincoln” to Obama

It’s common for the North to throw operatic insults at the military and diplomatic skill of both South Korea and the US. In April 2016, they went one step further, conjuring a letter from deceased 16th president Abraham Lincoln to President Obama. The “Lincoln letter – “dvice from Lincoln to Obama” was published on the internal state-run website DPRK Today, and was titled “Advice from Lincoln to Obama.”

Concern trolling Obama by saying that it looks like he has “a lot on his mind,” the letter scolds him and the US for not reducing their nuclear weapons stockpile, while simultaneously demanding the DPRK reduce theirs. “Lincoln” even throws himself under the bus, saying the American people won’t stand to be deceived the way he did back in the day.

“Hi there, Obama,” begins the letter in a guess-who’s-back-motherfucker kind of way. “I understand how perplexed you must feel nowadays, but I think this is the time for you to gather your thoughts as a president of a nation.”

In the letter, Lincoln derides Obama’s Nobel Peace Prize-winning push to build a nuclear-free world by questioning why the United States has not taken the initiative to scale back its nuclear arsenal first, even as it asks countries such as North Korea to scrap their atomic programs.

“If the United States, a country with the world’s largest nuclear weapons stockpile, only pays lip service, like a parrot, and doesn’t do anything actively, it will be a mockery to the entire world,” the letter has Lincoln say.

Although the fake Lincoln criticizes Obama, the North doesn’t portray the late president as a good leader.

No Smiling On The Anniversary of Kim Il-Sung’s Death

Kim Jong-un‘s grandfather, Kim Il-sung, is presented as the benevolent father of the nation. Though he died in 1994, the date of his death, July 8, is a day of nationwide mourning. And North Koreans are expected to grieve and grieve noticeably. The law forbids smiling or even talking loudly on July 8. Kim Jong-il had died of a suspected heart attack while travelling by train to an area outside Pyongyang. He was succeeded by his youngest son Kim Jong-un, who was hailed by the Korean Central News Agency as the “Great Successor”.

The Kim dynasty has ruled North Korea since 1948 for three generations, and still little about the family is publicly confirmed. Kim Il-sung rebelled against Japan’s rule of Korea in the 1930s, which led to his exile in the Soviet Union. … He started the Korean War in 1950 with hopes to reunify the region.

North Korea takes its mourning seriously; when Kim Jong-un’s father, Kim Jong-il, died, citizens were sent to labor camps for not grieving hard enough. This law carries over into any reverential activities surrounding both Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il. No gum-chewing, loud talking, or boisterous behavior is allowed near their statues or during times of paying respect.