Chilling Theory About the Assassination of Martin Luther King

On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King was assassinated by a sniper outside the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. Two months later, King’s killer, James Earl Ray, was apprehended. After pleading guilty, he was sentenced to 99 years in prison. Like all famous assassinations, this one is surrounded by conspiracy theories. Ray recanted his guilty plea and claimed he was set up as a patsy to take the fall for King’s assassination. By the time Ray died in 1998, even King’s son was convinced that Ray did not commit the murder.

Martin Luther King Jr Assassination
Assassination of Martin Luther King

The biggest unanswered question behind this alleged conspiracy theory is the existence of a mysterious unidentified figure named Raoul. In 1967, Ray was a fugitive who had escaped a Missouri prison while serving time for robbery. After fleeing to Montreal, Ray claimed he crossed paths with a shadowy individual calling himself Raoul, who hired Ray to perform smuggling jobs for him. Days before King’s assassination, Ray purchased a rifle in Birmingham, Alabama. This rifle was found near the Lorraine Motel and determined to be the murder weapon. However, Ray maintained that Raoul ordered him to purchase the rifle and that he gave the weapon to Raoul on April 3. The next day, Raoul told Ray to rent a room at a boardinghouse overlooking the Lorraine Motel. This was the location where Ray allegedly shot King, but Ray claimed he was at an entirely different location when the shooting took place.

Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.

Martin Luther King

There has always been debate about whether Raoul was the mastermind behind King’s assassination or a complete fabrication dreamed up by James Earl Ray. If Raoul really did exist, his identity could shed a lot of light on Martin Luther King’s murder.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.

Martin Luther King

The Invisible Pink Unicorn – alt.atheism

The Invisible Pink Unicorn  was “revealed to” the Usenet newsgroup alt.atheism in 1990.

The Invisible Pink Unicorn Movement
The Invisible Pink Unicorn (IPU) is the goddess of a parody religion used to satirize atheistic beliefs

Since then, she’s acquired all the trappings of a real deity: gospels (“according to St. Sascha”), revelations (to “St. Bryce the Long-Winded”), relics (the Holy Sock of Bob), scripture, and historic artworks.

“Invisible Pink Unicorn is beings of great spiritual power. We know this because unicorns are capable of being invisible and pink at the same time. Like all religions, the Faith of the Invisible Pink Unicorn is based upon both logic and faith. We have faith that they are pink; we logically know that they are invisible because we can’t see them.”

 

Nowadays, the Invisible Pink Unicorn has become a metaphor to depict atheists, for it is some kind of spearhead that is used as an illustration of the problem faced by atheists when asked to disprove the existence of a god by those of a religious persuasion.

Followers debate her attributes, but it’s generally agreed that she prefers pineapple and ham pizza to pepperoni and mushroom, which is said to be eaten only by followers of the Purple Oyster of Doom. The IPU also “raptures” socks from laundry as a sign of favor.

 

Is this harmless fun or awful blasphemy? It’s getting hard to care. As the French writer Edmond de Goncourt wrote, “If there is a God, atheism must seem to him as less of an insult than religion.”

This “Religion”, since its creation, has gathered many followers.
Starting around 2001, websites dedicated to that myth have been created: