Steven Spielberg’s Honorary Doctorate

When Steven Spielberg was to be awarded his honorary doctorate from USC’s Cinematic Arts School, he agreed to accept only if it was personally signed by the admissions officer who rejected him for an average “C” grade when he applied there as an aspiring film student. It was.

Spielberg receiving an honorary doctor of arts degree during Harvard University commencement exercises,
Steven Spielberg receiving an honorary doctor of arts degree during Harvard University commencement exercises

You can still have an erection once dead

A death erection (sometimes referred to as “angel lust”) is a post-mortem erection which occurs when a male individual dies vertically or face-down with the cadaver remaining in this position. During life, the pumping of blood by the heart ensures a relatively even distribution around the blood vessels of the human body. Once this mechanism has ended, only the force of gravity acts upon the blood. As with any mass, the blood settles at the lowest point of the body and causes edema or swelling to occur; the discoloration caused by this is called lividity.

If an individual dies vertically such as in a hanging, the blood will settle in the legs and pool at the feet. The pressure will be greatest as the weight of the blood pushes down. This causes the blood vessels and tissues in the feet to engorge to their greatest elastic capacity and hold the greatest volume of blood possible. This effect occurs right up the legs although to a lesser extent than the feet and is also notable at the waist. The blood which remains in the torso attempts to move to a lower position due to gravity, and as the blood in the waist causes the penis, consisting of erectile tissue, to fill with blood and expand. This is the death erection. As long as the body remains in this position the effect will continue.

It is arguable that carrots are orange, because oranges are orange

 So because oranges are orange, it became the color of the Dutch (The House of Orange-Nassau)
The modern orange carrot was developed and stabilised by Dutch growers in the 16-17th century

Carrots used to be yellow, white and purple but not orange. Selection and hybridization brought us to the orange carrots we know today. Why orange? Because of the name of a principality in France.

In the south of France, there was a Principality of Orange (1163 to 1713). This principality became a part of the holdings of the House of Nassau (1544), which has lead to the beginning of the House of Orange-Nassau. This family is best known today for the Dutch royal family (Kingdom of the Netherlands).
Although the principality of Orange was not named after the fruit orange, the color orange (named after the fruit) was adopted as a symbol of the House of Orange-Nassau. Until today, the color orange is seen as the national color; the Dutch soccerteam plays in orange and on the national holiday Queensday/Kingsday you see orange everywhere.

The modern orange carrot was developed and stabilised by Dutch growers in the 16-17th century. Some say to honor the prince William of Orange, however for this is no historical evidence. What is likely, is that the Dutch used the orange carrot as a political weapon during the rise and fall of the House of Orange-Nassau.

So because oranges are orange, it became the color of the Dutch (The House of Orange-Nassau). The Dutch later created the orange carrot as we known it today.