Amazing Quotations

  • An excellent plumber is infinitely more admirable than an incompetent philosopher. The society which scorns excellence in plumbing because plumbing is a humble activity, and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is an exalted activity, will have neither good plumbing nor good philosophy. Neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water. — John W. Gardner (1912-2002)
  • Money is nothing more or less than a commodity to be used wisely for the greatest possible personal and family benefit. Its value lies not in what it is, but in what it can do. — Unknown
  • The eyes shout what the lips fear to say. — Will Henry [Henry Wilson Allen] (1912-1991)
  • Don’t spit in a well. You might want to drink from it. — Scottish Proverb
  • Warum so einfach wenn es so schõn kompliziert geht? Why be so simple when complexity is so beautiful? — German Maxim
  • The average reader is more interested in fun than in intellectual pursuits. — William A. Katz (1924-2004)
  • The most complicated task today is finding a way to live a simple life. — W. A. Nance
  • He who lowers himself to the level of others realizes only then how tall he once stood. — Jeck
  • We live in a world of unused and misapplied knowledge and skill. — H. G. Wells (1866-1946)
  • Bigness is constantly confused with virtue. — Peter Gellatly (1969)
  • Live in the past; it’s cheaper. Live in the future; it’s better. — Magazine Ad
  • Education in the West, particularly higher education in America, has lost the ability to see the universe from very far away. — Charles Van Doren (1926- )
  • Novel: A prose narrative of some length that has something wrong with it. — Randell Jarrell (1914-1965)
  • A writer begins and ends with language. — Unknown
  • Sorrow is too great to exist in small hearts. — Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931)
  • The strongest memory is weaker than the palest ink. — Chinese Proverb
  • English is a funny language. A fat chance and a slim chance are the same thing. — Jack Herbert
  • An old mountain man’s prayer: "Lord, I don’t ask for a faith that would move yonder mountain. I can take enough dynamite and move it, if it needs movin’. I pray, Lord, for enough faith to move me." — Norman Allen
  • The peoples’ Winter will pass away, and then comes the beautiful Spring, and the flowers must surely bloom in the fields, and the brooks will again leap in the valleys. — Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931)
  • Love is an act of faith, and whoever is of little faith is also of little love. — Erich Fromm (1900-1980)
  • Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity. — Horace Mann (1796-1859)
  • We are the sons of Sorrow; we are the poets and the prophets and the musicians. — Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931)
  • See deep enough, and you see musically; the heart of Nature being everywhere music, if you can only reach it. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)
  • Life is weaker than Death and Death is weaker than Truth. — Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931)
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  • Thought, true labor of any kind, highest virtue itself, is it not the daughter of Pain? — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)
  • The very strength that protects the heart from injury is the strength that prevents the heart from enlarging to its intended greatness within. — Kahlil Gibran (1883-1931)
  • ‘Tis sweet to feel by what fine-spun threads our affections are drawn together. — Laurence Sterne (1713-1768)
  • Parting is all we know of heaven, and all we need of hell. — Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)
  • What is dignity… what is appearance, if it keeps us from talking together? — Ray Hill
  • The function of the expert is not to be more right than other people, but to be wrong for more sophisticated reasons. — David Butler (1924- )
  • The height of embarrassment is when two sets of eyes meet through a keyhole. — Unknown
  • No matter how busy a man is, he is never too busy to stop and talk about how busy he is. — Unknown
  • It is with narrow-souled people as with narrow-necked bottles: the less they have in them, the more noise they make pouring it out. — Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
  • If a man desires to live a great life, let him remember that evil is always necessary. — Roy L. Smith
  • The part of a man’s religion which is convenient, that he’ll never drop. — A. A. Horn
  • It is not true that men prefer foolish women. Rather they prefer women who can simulate foolishness whenever necessary, which is the very core of intelligence. — Paul Eldridge (1888-1982)
  • Any fool can have bad luck; the art consists in knowing how to exploit it. — Frank Wedekind (1864-1918)
  • Whenever you hear the word "inevitable", watch out! An enemy of humanity has identified himself. — Stephen Vizinczey (1933- )
  • The greatest educational dogma is also its greatest fallacy: the belief that what must be learned can necessarily be taught. — Sydney J. Harris (1917-1986)
  • The devil does a nice business for such a lousy location. — D. Bennett
  • Too great a sense of identity makes a man feel he can do no wrong. And too little does the same. — Djuna Barnes (1892-1982)
  • Not blind opposition to progress, but opposition to blind progress. — Sierra Club Slogan
  • Leopards! Be ready for a spot check! — Graffiti
  • A rut is a grave with both ends open. — Carol Hicks
  • Science has made us gods before we are worthy of being men. — Jean Rostand (1894-1977)
  • Science has promised us truth an understanding of such relationships as our minds can grasp; it has never promised us either peace or happiness. — Gustave Le Bon (1841-1931)
  • One holds his job by knowing how. One becomes boss by knowing why. — Perry Tanksley
  • Bad administration can destroy good policy; but good administration can never save bad policy. — Adlai Stevenson (1900-1965)
  • Pornography is writing that seeks primarily, even exclusively, to bring about sexual stimulation. This can be done crudely or delicately. In the former case it would be bad literature; in the latter good. — Kenneth Tynan (1927-1980)
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  • The richest and most powerful society in history, called to responsibility, if not leadership, in the spherical, scientific, social[ized], secular, dynamic, crowded, and contentious world promised us by the twenty-first century, must develop the facilities for knowing that world as completely as possible. Of these our libraries form not the least important element. — Mortimer Graves (1893-1987)