Honey does not go bad, spoil or expire on its own – How It Works?

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Honey does not go bad, spoil or expire on its own - How It Works? 1

Honey has been called the only food that really lasts forever, thanks to his magical chemistry and manual work of bees. flowers nectar mixes with enzymes within bees extract, which adjustment and it breaks the composition nectar into simple sugars which are deposited in honeycombs. Fanning action from the wings of bees and enzymes in the stomach to create a liquid which is both very low in acid and digs-humidity really inhospitable for bacterial growth.

The main reason that honey does not go bad because it is hygroscopic. Now, for all non-chemists reading this post, do not let the word scare “hygroscopic” you. A substance is considered hygroscopic when he did not own a lot of water content, but readily absorbs water from its surroundings.

Some common examples of hygroscopic substances (other than honey) include sodium chloride (salt), ethanol, wood, caramel, concentrated sulfuric acid, methanol, and a wide variety of fertilizer.

Many say that to stay healthy, we need to completely replace all the sugar in their food with honey, because it does not take much of a toll on a body like sugar does. Although this statement may not be necessarily true, one thing that does stand out is that honey is indeed a source of fantastic food. As such, there are many creatures who can not imagine their life without honey being a part of it.

The processing and sealing honey also adds to its indefinite life. Despite being low in moisture, honey sugars are hygroscopic, meaning they take moisture from the air. When heated and strained honey is sealed properly, moisture can not be absorbed, and honey remains the same forever. The oldest ever found pot of sweet stuff is supposed to be 5,500 years old.

Bees play a huge role in the production of honey last forever. You see, the first material collected by bees to make honey – nectar – has a very high natural water content. However, bees play the most important role in the drying of nectar by beating their wings very quickly.

Thereafter, when bees vomit nectar in the honeycombs (yes, they vomit in there), an enzyme known as glucose oxidase their stomach mixes with the nectar and it decomposes into two products: the peroxide hydrogen and gluconic acid. It is hydrogen peroxide that maintains the germs and other hostile microorganisms at bay.

This is one reason why honey can be (in some cases) used on open wounds and has great medicinal value.

Although honey has very little clean water, it easily absorbs water from the environment due to its hygroscopic nature. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the honey is stored in a dry container, airtight, especially if you have big plans for use within a few decades!